Over the bar

Latest news from the winery.

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet

Posted by Jenny Semmler on

Australians love their varietal wines - Shiraz, Cabernet, Riesling, Merlot. Not all wines can be labelled by variety however, because they are made from complex blends or are represented by a style name, such as Champagne, Port, Sherry, Lambrusco and so on. However a number of these terms are protected for Europe under trade agreements, so the term "Burgundy" has disappeared from Australian wines and has been replaced by "Pinot Noir", the main variety in Burgundy wines.

We' re often asked for a "Port" or a "Sherry", which are Portuguese and Spanish styles respectively. In Australia, we haven't been able to use these terms for over a decade for our fortified wines. Our wines include the fresher, earlier drinking styles, a white fortified we have named "Lambada" (because it is made from Latin varieties), the Ruby (based on the fresh youthful Ruby Port style), the Vintage (the highest quality only made in exceptional years) and the Tawny, the familiar barrel-aged style that Australians love so much. 

The term "Sherry" has disappeared too, as this is a designated Spanish style originating from the town of Jerez de la Frontera . In Australia, the term Apera is now used to designate a fresh, savoury style with an intense aroma of nuts and apples. The terms designating the different grades (fino, amontillado, oloroso, palo cortada) are also restricted, as is the term Manzanilla (literally "Camomile") which designates a super-fine style from the town of Sanlúcar de la Barrameda. 

Our Pale Dry Apera is a fine, intensely aromatic style made from Palomino grapes, picked early and with neutral flavours and aroma. We ferment the juice to dryness, then lightly fortify it with fine spirit. The wine is then transferred to aged oak barrels containing a creamy thick layer of yeast that floats on the surface, giving the wine the appearance of a garden of camomile flowers. After 4-6 years the wine has developed its characteristic nutty and apple aroma, and a full but finely textured palate. We blend and bottle this style twice a year so that our bottled stock remains fresh and vibrant. 

We love to drink the Pale Dry Apera, affectionately known at 919 as PDA, chilled, as the sun goes down after a warm day.

You can find cocktail recipes on our blog post here

Read more

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet

Posted by Jenny Semmler on

Australians love their varietal wines - Shiraz, Cabernet, Riesling, Merlot. Not all wines can be labelled by variety however, because they are made from complex blends or are represented by a style name, such as Champagne, Port, Sherry, Lambrusco and so on. However a number of these terms are protected for Europe under trade agreements, so the term "Burgundy" has disappeared from Australian wines and has been replaced by "Pinot Noir", the main variety in Burgundy wines.

We' re often asked for a "Port" or a "Sherry", which are Portuguese and Spanish styles respectively. In Australia, we haven't been able to use these terms for over a decade for our fortified wines. Our wines include the fresher, earlier drinking styles, a white fortified we have named "Lambada" (because it is made from Latin varieties), the Ruby (based on the fresh youthful Ruby Port style), the Vintage (the highest quality only made in exceptional years) and the Tawny, the familiar barrel-aged style that Australians love so much. 

The term "Sherry" has disappeared too, as this is a designated Spanish style originating from the town of Jerez de la Frontera . In Australia, the term Apera is now used to designate a fresh, savoury style with an intense aroma of nuts and apples. The terms designating the different grades (fino, amontillado, oloroso, palo cortada) are also restricted, as is the term Manzanilla (literally "Camomile") which designates a super-fine style from the town of Sanlúcar de la Barrameda. 

Our Pale Dry Apera is a fine, intensely aromatic style made from Palomino grapes, picked early and with neutral flavours and aroma. We ferment the juice to dryness, then lightly fortify it with fine spirit. The wine is then transferred to aged oak barrels containing a creamy thick layer of yeast that floats on the surface, giving the wine the appearance of a garden of camomile flowers. After 4-6 years the wine has developed its characteristic nutty and apple aroma, and a full but finely textured palate. We blend and bottle this style twice a year so that our bottled stock remains fresh and vibrant. 

We love to drink the Pale Dry Apera, affectionately known at 919 as PDA, chilled, as the sun goes down after a warm day.

You can find cocktail recipes on our blog post here

Read more


Digging deep for drought relief

Posted by Jenny Semmler on

Digging deep for drought relief

Thank you for your generous donations.

Thank you for your generous donations towards the drought relief effort. You donated when you purchased wine from us or by being the successful bidder for a 6 pack of rare and exceptional wines.  A total of $362 has been forwarded to the CWA NSW for their drought relief effort. 

 

Fundraiser details

The dry is marching inexorably south from New South Wales and Queensland, and our fellow farmers there are in great distress. We can't sit idly by. We have two fund-raiser activities for drought relief. 
At 919 Wines we are connected to the land, and our hearts go out to those who have been in drought for several years now. Farmers and their families put the welfare of their stock and the local wildlife ahead of their own well-being in many circumstances, and as their financial resources dwindle the communities around them suffer.
All the money raised will be donated to the CWA/NSW branch Drought Aid Program, where it will be distributed to families for their household bills. We have specifically selected this organisation as the money will stay within communities and supplement those families who are putting the welfare of animals first. For more information on the Drought Aid Program, go to https://www.cwaofnsw.org.au/droughtaid.html 

  • Option 1: Place a bid on our case of rare wine. All the money raised will go to the relief effort.
  • Option 2: Purchase a case of wine on our web store. 20% of the purchase price will be donated to the relief effort.

 See below for details.

Rare & exceptional wine auction: winemaker's private cellar

We have dug deep into our private cellar, and have pulled out the very last bottle of 919 2010 Durif (the last time this was available it sold within 30 seconds of going online) and the last bottle in captivity of the 2012 Shiraz. We have added 4 of our most awarded wines to make up a six pack.
The pack contains:



BIDDING INSTRUCTIONS

Bidding opens on publication. Bids will be published anonymously on our web page as they are received (so check the highest bid before you text!). Highest bid at 7pm on Sunday 26th August 2018 will be the successful bidder.
TEXT YOUR BID to 0408 855 272.

See current high bid at top of page. 

Percentage of online sales

We will donate 20% from all sales made through our on-line ordering system until 7pm on Sunday 26th August 2018. We will publish your name and contribution on our website (unless you ask for an anonymous donation). No code is necessary, it will happen automatically. 919 Wines will pay all the taxes. 

 

Read more

Digging deep for drought relief

Posted by Jenny Semmler on

Digging deep for drought relief

Thank you for your generous donations.

Thank you for your generous donations towards the drought relief effort. You donated when you purchased wine from us or by being the successful bidder for a 6 pack of rare and exceptional wines.  A total of $362 has been forwarded to the CWA NSW for their drought relief effort. 

 

Fundraiser details

The dry is marching inexorably south from New South Wales and Queensland, and our fellow farmers there are in great distress. We can't sit idly by. We have two fund-raiser activities for drought relief. 
At 919 Wines we are connected to the land, and our hearts go out to those who have been in drought for several years now. Farmers and their families put the welfare of their stock and the local wildlife ahead of their own well-being in many circumstances, and as their financial resources dwindle the communities around them suffer.
All the money raised will be donated to the CWA/NSW branch Drought Aid Program, where it will be distributed to families for their household bills. We have specifically selected this organisation as the money will stay within communities and supplement those families who are putting the welfare of animals first. For more information on the Drought Aid Program, go to https://www.cwaofnsw.org.au/droughtaid.html 

  • Option 1: Place a bid on our case of rare wine. All the money raised will go to the relief effort.
  • Option 2: Purchase a case of wine on our web store. 20% of the purchase price will be donated to the relief effort.

 See below for details.

Rare & exceptional wine auction: winemaker's private cellar

We have dug deep into our private cellar, and have pulled out the very last bottle of 919 2010 Durif (the last time this was available it sold within 30 seconds of going online) and the last bottle in captivity of the 2012 Shiraz. We have added 4 of our most awarded wines to make up a six pack.
The pack contains:



BIDDING INSTRUCTIONS

Bidding opens on publication. Bids will be published anonymously on our web page as they are received (so check the highest bid before you text!). Highest bid at 7pm on Sunday 26th August 2018 will be the successful bidder.
TEXT YOUR BID to 0408 855 272.

See current high bid at top of page. 

Percentage of online sales

We will donate 20% from all sales made through our on-line ordering system until 7pm on Sunday 26th August 2018. We will publish your name and contribution on our website (unless you ask for an anonymous donation). No code is necessary, it will happen automatically. 919 Wines will pay all the taxes. 

 

Read more


I feel like dancing!

Posted by Eric Semmler on

What is a Lambada?

No, not the dance!

Not so long ago Australian winemakers named the styles of wine after European styles - Hermitage (think Grange), White Burgundy (think Houghton’s) and Port. After signing and international agreement Australian wines can no longer be given the names of European counterparts. In return, Europe agrees not to use Australian terms such as Apera, Topaque, Coonawarra or Barossa.

The option of new names has been relatively easy. Our fino became Pale Dry Apera, and our fortified Muscadelle became Topaque. With our other fortified styles we simply dropped the word “port”, leaving vintage, ruby and tawny styles. 

Except for “white port”.

Our white fortified style is part of the Latin Collection, named because they are made from grapes originating from the Latin countries (Spain, Portugal, Italy). And so we chose a name that reflected its Latin heritage - the seductive and hot-blooded Lambada. 

Lambada is made from a base blend of the Latin varieties Malvasia, Muscat Gordo Blanco (“the big fat muscat”) and Palomino. It’s then aged on for a few years, giving it that warm, golden glow. During this time it develops luscious elegant flavours of butterscotch, dried apricots and spice. 

So, 919 Latin Collection Lambada is not a dance, but you never know - it might make you get up and have a go!

 

Buttered Pears

Buttered Pears are the perfect partner to Lambada, and super simple to make. 

5 minutes preparation 

50 minutes cooking.

 

1 pear per person, cored and halved (you can leave the skin on)

1 teaspoon of butter per pear half (no, you can’t substitute margarine this time - sorry!)

1 teaspoon of honey per pear half

 

Arrange the pear halves face up in a ceramic baking dish. Place a teaspoon of butter and a teaspoon of honey into the hollows left when the cores were removed. Bake about half an hour at 180℃. Turn the pears over and bake a further 20 minutes or so until the skins are glowing golden.

Serve with whipped cream and Lambada.

Read more

I feel like dancing!

Posted by Eric Semmler on

What is a Lambada?

No, not the dance!

Not so long ago Australian winemakers named the styles of wine after European styles - Hermitage (think Grange), White Burgundy (think Houghton’s) and Port. After signing and international agreement Australian wines can no longer be given the names of European counterparts. In return, Europe agrees not to use Australian terms such as Apera, Topaque, Coonawarra or Barossa.

The option of new names has been relatively easy. Our fino became Pale Dry Apera, and our fortified Muscadelle became Topaque. With our other fortified styles we simply dropped the word “port”, leaving vintage, ruby and tawny styles. 

Except for “white port”.

Our white fortified style is part of the Latin Collection, named because they are made from grapes originating from the Latin countries (Spain, Portugal, Italy). And so we chose a name that reflected its Latin heritage - the seductive and hot-blooded Lambada. 

Lambada is made from a base blend of the Latin varieties Malvasia, Muscat Gordo Blanco (“the big fat muscat”) and Palomino. It’s then aged on for a few years, giving it that warm, golden glow. During this time it develops luscious elegant flavours of butterscotch, dried apricots and spice. 

So, 919 Latin Collection Lambada is not a dance, but you never know - it might make you get up and have a go!

 

Buttered Pears

Buttered Pears are the perfect partner to Lambada, and super simple to make. 

5 minutes preparation 

50 minutes cooking.

 

1 pear per person, cored and halved (you can leave the skin on)

1 teaspoon of butter per pear half (no, you can’t substitute margarine this time - sorry!)

1 teaspoon of honey per pear half

 

Arrange the pear halves face up in a ceramic baking dish. Place a teaspoon of butter and a teaspoon of honey into the hollows left when the cores were removed. Bake about half an hour at 180℃. Turn the pears over and bake a further 20 minutes or so until the skins are glowing golden.

Serve with whipped cream and Lambada.

Read more


It's easy being green

Posted by Jenny Semmler on

We often get asked about why we have growth down our vineyard mid-rows. It’s because we’re certified organic! We then get asked how hard this is to be certified. It’s not hard once you get your head around it.

Read more

It's easy being green

Posted by Jenny Semmler on

We often get asked about why we have growth down our vineyard mid-rows. It’s because we’re certified organic! We then get asked how hard this is to be certified. It’s not hard once you get your head around it.

Read more


Cellar Door Etiquette 101

Posted by Jenny Semmler on

When you visit a cellar door you are coming for more than just wine tasting. You are wanting an experience, to seek out the hidden gems, to learn something. At cellar door we want you to have the best time possible, and to fall in love with one or more of our wines. Here are a few tips to make your visit a memorable experience!

Read more

Cellar Door Etiquette 101

Posted by Jenny Semmler on

When you visit a cellar door you are coming for more than just wine tasting. You are wanting an experience, to seek out the hidden gems, to learn something. At cellar door we want you to have the best time possible, and to fall in love with one or more of our wines. Here are a few tips to make your visit a memorable experience!

Read more